Wednesday, November 16, 2005

Leeches: An Afternoon Delight

Leeches: An Afternoon Delight

I still remember that day on Plateau Lake, located northeast of Merritt, almost 25 years ago when my fly fishing partner and I learned a lot about leeches. It was early June and we had been having fairly good success that morning on chironomid pupal patterns fished on long leaders and floating fly lines. By noon the chironomids quit emerging in the shallow water so we moved out into deeper water in the hopes of finding an afternoon hatch. We soon found chironomids emerging in about 9 metres of water so dropped anchors and switched to sinking lines.
Over the next 2 hours a few more fish were fooled by our pupal patterns. By 3 o'clock it looked like we were finished for the day. It was agreed we would leave after the next fish.
Well, we would have left if that last fish hadn't spit out a couple of leeches while thrashing around the landing net. The still live leeches were mottled black and brown in colour. I put on a black seals fur leech and Don tied on the identical fly except tied with brown seals fur. We were both fishing slow sinking flylines and retrieving with very slow hand twists. I hooked a fish on my first cast and continued to get strikes about every other cast. After I landed several fish Don switched to the black seals fur leech but still did not get any strikes.
We then compared flies which were identical except my pattern was one size smaller. As soon as Don changed to the small fly he was instantly into fish. Checking the stomach of any fish you keep will provide useful feeding information. In this case the four fish we cleaned had a stomach full of chironomid pupa and one to three leeches as "dessert". A throat pump can also be used to sample the esophagus of a fish you intend to release alive. Since that day I have seen this lunch and dessert combo many times and make it a habit to fish leeches after a chironomid hatch begins to wane for the day.
That day also taught us how selective trout can be about size and colour even when feeding on bigger food items.

Basic Leech Facts

Leeches belong to the Phylum Annelida which includes earthworms and marine worms. The most noticeable difference between leeches and other annelid worms is their dorso-ventral flattened shape, that is, flattened top to bottom. Leeches also have suckers at either end of their bodies. They typically swim in a slow up and down undulating motion but when agitated can move at a much faster pace.
Contrary to popular belief the vast majority of leech species in North America are not blood suckers but are omnivorous. They feed on a variety of food sources including insects, freshwater shrimp, decomposing vegetation and carrion. When fully extended big leeches can reach over 25 cm in length.
Most common sizes range from 3 to 7 cm long. Colouration varies considerably with the most prominent colours being mottled brown and green, black and brown, maroon and various shades of green. The underside of a leech is typically lighter in colour than the backside.
Leeches are most often found living near the bottom of the lake in water less than 8 metres deep. This is because their preferred food sources are found amongst the vegetation associated with areas of the lake that receive the greatest amount of sunlight.
Leeches have a unique reproductive life cycle. They are hermaphroditic. Each individual carries both male and female reproductive organs. This allows a leech to reproduce by itself but more commonly a pair will mate with both partners developing fertilized egg masses. Egg clusters are commonly attached to bottom debris, rocks, or buried in the lake bottom substrate. Most mating occurs during the spring months. Some species of leeches are known to live in excess of 10 years.

Fishing Strategies

Leeches are available as a trout food source throughout the year. This is why leeches are known as good searching patterns. They are always a good choice when exploring a new lake or fishing during non-hatch periods. However, there are certain times when fish will feed on them more intensely. The spring period which coincides with the most intense chironomid hatches is an excellent time to be tying leeches.
At this time of the year leeches may be found swimming at all depths. Try fishing patterns close to the bottom first then gradually move up the water column. Use a moderately slow hand twist retrieve to imitate the natural undulating motion. Fast sinking (type II), slow sinking (type I), intermediate sinking and floating lines are all good choices for imitating leeches at various depth levels.
Remember to keep an eye out for real leeches swimming by to give you an indication of actual colour and size in the lake.
Another good time to fish leeches is at night during the hot summer months. At this time of the year, during daylight hours, the shallower shoal water is often too warm for trout to comfortably feed in. Fish will sit in the deeper water just above the thermocline. The thermocline is described as that depth zone of water where the heat from the sun no longer penetrates and thus the water remains quite cool but still well oxygenated. In most small lakes the thermocline establishes between 6 and 8 metres deep. At night the shallower water cools enough for fish, and often big ones come onto the shoals to feed.
Leeches are big food items and often sought out by these nocturnally feeding trout. Fishing tactics change when night fishing. A floating flyline and a 4 metre long leader ending with 3 to 3.5 kilogram tippet is standard equipment. The heavier tippet material is required to cast big leech patterns and provide better odds in landing big fish. In most of these situations you will be anchoring in less than 3 metres of water casting towards bulrush or cattail patches.
Trout will cruise along the edges of these emergent vegetation patches in search of big food items such as leeches. Cast your leech pattern, wait for the fly to sink close to the bottom and then begin a moderately fast strip or hand twist retrieve. Woolly Bugger and Matuka patterns are good night leech imitations as they offer a pulsating action when pulled through the water. Be sure to try bead-headed patterns as the added weight will add more undulating action to the fly during the retrieve. Trout can detect the added motion of the fly and hone in on these imitations despite the extremely low light conditions.
Be extra careful when retrieving your flyline into the boat or float tube when night fishing. You want to ensure there are no tangles in the flyline when that really big fish hits and starts for the other end of the lake.
The late fall season is also an excellent time to fish productive lakes. The major insect hatches are long gone so overwintering food sources such as shrimp, dragonfly nymphs, caddis larvae and leeches are actively sought out by trout.
The shallow water or shoal areas of the lakes again become the major feeding area at this time of year. Leeches can be effectively fished on slow sinking, intermediate sinking and floating fly lines. First try fishing your leech patterns close to the bottom of the shoal then work higher in the water column. Start out by retrieving the leech pattern slowly and if unsuccessful gradually speed up the retrieve.
Late fall fishing is certainly a good time of the year to hook a really big trout. Make sure that your fly hooks are sharp so that they can penetrate the tough cartilage mouth parts of those really big fish.
Most ardent stillwater fly fishers have created their own proven leech patterns; however, there are also numerous commercially tied designs that also fool trout.
Some of the more effective leech patterns are tied using materials such as dyed marabou feathers, mohair, seals fur, rabbit strips, sparkle chenilles and saddle hackles. Proven leech patterns have several common features:
  • soft in design and appearance so that they look alive when retrieved through the water
  • tied in one solid colour or in natural colour combinations i.e. Black, brown, maroon, green or brown and black, brown and green, black and maroon
  • tied in a variety of sizes for selective trout
  • beads or cone heads will add more action to the retrieved fly
Stillwater fly fishers should have a good selection of leech patterns in their fly box.
They are readily available and as we know, trout certainly will key in on them as the main meal or "dessert" at specific times of the year.

Author: Brian Chan, Fishing Advisor, Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC

Imitating Water Boatmen and Backswimmers For Fly-Fishing Success

Imitating Water Boatmen and Backswimmers For Fly-Fishing Success

Water boatmen and backswimmers are a lesser-known but still-important food source for trout and char in lakes. Both insects are easily identified by their beetle-like shape, and elongated pairs of hind legs that are feathered and resemble an oar. These legs are what propel them through the water.
When underwater, boatmen and backswimmers are found hiding amongst the vegetation growing up off the bottom of the shoal or shallow-water zones of a lake. Air-breathing insects of the order Hemiptera, they have to come up to the lake’s surface to trap a bubble of air. This air bubble allows them to swim down and back up through the water column.


Backswimmer
Boatmen and backswimmers are excellent fliers, which is part of the reason why they are of interest to trout and char. These insects undergo mating and swarming flights during the early spring and mid- to late fall. Classic boatmen/backswimmer flights occur on calm, sunny days. Thousands of the insects literally fly into the surface film, like raindrops falling from the blue sky, and then attempt to swim to the lake bottom to lay eggs.
Trout soon locate these dive bombers, many of which are momentarily stunned and struggling in the surface film. Slashing and boiling riseforms signal the attack on those insects, while more are picked off as they swim down to or up from the lake bottom. Before one knows it, the insect flight and fall are over; the water’s surface becomes quiet again, without any sign of an insect emergence having occurred.
Common colouration of water boatmen adults is a dark brown to black shellback (wing case), with an olive green to lemon yellow underside or abdomen. The plastron, or air bubble, is then overlaid on the surface of the abdomen. Boatmen bodies reach about five millimetres in length. Their cousins, the backswimmers, often have a mottled dark brown and tan shellback or wing case, and an abdomen that usually displays a mottled pattern of several colours including yellow, tan, and olive. Backswimmers are much larger, reaching almost 10 millimetres in length. As their name implies, they do swim upside down.


Six Mile Lake Boatman

Fly-Fishing Tactics

Trout and char can feed on boatmen and backswimmers in very shallow water as well as in the deepest parts of the lake. Therefore, use a variety of sinking fly lines to present flies imitating the real bugs. With sinking lines, the number designation indicates the approximate rate at which a line sinks in inches per second (for example, a Type 6 line would sink at about six inches per second). Intermediate (Type 1) or slow-sinking lines (Type 2 or 3) are best for covering shallow water zones that are less than a depth of about three metres (10 feet). Deeper zones of the lake can be very effectively covered with faster, full-sinking lines (like Type 5, 6, or 7).
Allow the fly line and fly to sink to just off the bottom. Then impart a quick, continuous, five- to seven-centimetre (two- to three-inch) strip retrieve. In deeper water, it’s best to make as long a cast as possible, and wait a little longer for the fly line and fly to sink to the bottom. The idea is to retrieve the boatman or backswimmer pattern up through the entire water column.
Boatmen and backswimmers are fairly easy to imitate at the tying bench. Key features to consider are the general oval body shape, the long pair of hind legs, and the plastron of trapped air enveloping the underside of the abdomen. Sparkle Chenille, Flashabou, silver Mylars, and iridescent synthetic dubbings are just a few of the materials one can use to help give the illusion of the air bubble. Beadhead Prince Nymphs and Zug Bugs will often fool fish during the early stages of a fall or dispersion flight, but trout tend to get more selective after having eaten a few of the real insects. It’s always a good idea to check out a local fly shop for commercially tied imitations developed for the area’s waters.

Chironomids: Spring's First Insect Hatch

Chironomids: Spring's First Insect Hatch

Spring has finally arrived, and the fishing season is already well underway on lakes in the coastal regions of British Columbia. The first few low-elevation lakes in the southern Interior are now ice-free; serious anglers are ready to start fishing. Stillwater fly-fishers look forward to the first insect hatches of the year, always midges, which are more commonly referred to as chironomids.
Members of the Dipteran order of insects, there are over 2,500 species of chironomids found in freshwater habitats throughout North America. Adult midges look like mosquitoes, but the females do not feed on blood. They are one of the most abundant food sources found in small lakes throughout our province. Since trout, char, and even kokanee feed extensively on chironomids, these small insects make a great food source for fly-tyers to imitate.
In a typical one-year life cycle, chironomids undergo a complete metamorphosis that includes egg, larva, pupa, and flying-adult stages. After hatching, the larvae live buried in the mud/water interface at the bottom of a lake at depths ranging from a couple of metres to over 25 metres. The larvae, commonly red or green in colour, have a worm-like body shape with distinct segmentation. They feed on decomposing plant and other organic matter. Once fully developed, the larvae seal themselves in a tube-shaped structure at the bottom of the lake.
Inside this structure, the larvae transform into the pupal stage. When fully mature, the pupae break out of the old larval structure, and ascend to the lake’s surface to complete their emergence to the adult stage.
Once at the surface, the adult chironomid emerge from the old pupal shuck, and fly off the water to nearby shoreline vegetation. Mating occurs within 24 hours of emergence. Egg-laden females return to the lake to release their eggs, which sink to the lake bottom. Eggs hatch into microscopic larvae, which settle into the bottom substrate to start the next generation of chironomids.

Chironomid larvae and pupae are highly sought-after by game fish. Trout and brook char actively search out the larvae, also known as bloodworms, that are hidden in the bottom substrate of the lake. Bloodworms can get quite large: as long as 25 millimetres. The early spring and late fall are always good times to try fishing bloodworm fly patterns. A good technique for presenting larval patterns is to use a floating fly-line with strike-indicator set-up that suspends larval patterns within a few centimetres of the bottom.

Trout, brook char, and kokanee also target chironomid pupae as they are making their vertical ascent to the lake’s surface. Pupae could be emerging from water as shallow as two metres, with the majority of hatches occurring in depths between three and eight metres. During a heavy hatch, there could be literally hundreds of thousands or more chironomid pupae slowly rising through the water. The pupae do not swim, but use gases built up under their outer cuticle to float them to the surface. Fish just slowly swim through, and gorge themselves on the masses of helpless pupae.

Since chironomid pupae come in a variety of sizes and colours, the key to success is having the right size and colour of pupal imitation. The predominant sizes are imitated using size #14 to #10 scud hooks; the most common pupal body colours are black, shades of green, brown, maroon, and silver. Carry a small aquarium net to capture pupae as they reach the surface, then match your fly’s hook size and pattern colour. A floating fly-line with strike-indicator set-up is the easiest, and often most effective, way to fish your pupal imitation. As most pupal-feeding occurs within about a metre of the lake bottom, start fishing your fly about 30 centimetres off the bottom regardless of the depth you are anchored in.

Chironomids are the most abundant aquatic insect in lakes. They hatch throughout the open-water period, but emergences are heaviest in the spring. Your local fly or tackle shop can help to set you up with the right gear and flies. There are also numerous books and videos that feature chironomid fly-fishing tactics, and instructions on tying chironomid fly patterns.

It’s time to get out and take advantage of this spring’s chironomid fishing.

Author: Brian Chan, Fishing Advisor, Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC

May is for Mayflies

May is for Mayflies

Mayflies are common inhabitants of many productive stillwaters. During spring, mayfly emergences typically follow the heavy hatches of chironomids. May is often a good month to find mayflies hatching, but the timing of their emergence is based on water temperature. This year’s early ice off will see good hatches as early as mid-April on some low-elevation lakes.

The majority of mayflies we see in small Interior stillwaters belong to the Baetidae family and genus Callibaetis. They are commonly known as speckle-wing mayflies. Preferred habitat for the nymphs is the submergent (partly submerged) and benthic (bottom) vegetation covering the shallow water or shoal zones of a lake. The most abundant populations are found in clear-water lakes with abundant marl, and chara-lined shoals. While “marl” looks like white or yellowish-white sand covering the lake-bottom, it is actually calcium-laden particulate that has formed a shallow layer covering the shoals. “Chara,” or “stonewort,” is a calcium-encrusted green alga prominent in alkaline stillwaters throughout North America.

Most mayflies have a one-year life cycle. As the name suggests, their most intense emergences to the adult stages typically occur in the spring to early-summer months. Trout feed heavily on the short but intense emergent swims of the mature mayfly nymph.  The nymphs swim en masse on a shallow angle to the lake’s surface to emerge into the sub-adult, or “dun” stage. Mayfly nymph-fishing is typically done on the shoal, or in water less than about eight metres (25 feet) in depth. Trout also feed on the partially emerged nymphs as they struggle to break through the surface film. Newly emerged duns are again easy food items for foraging trout. Splashy surface riseforms are the telltale sign that trout are picking off the adults as they sit on the surface film.

Trout also feed on immature or juvenile mayfly nymphs that live amongst the rooted vegetation and chara masses covering the lake’s shoal areas. Immature mayfly nymphs show up most commonly in the diet of trout during the fall.

Imitating the various life stages of mayflies, and their movement through or on the water, is best accomplished with floating and intermediate sinking fly-lines.  A floating line with varied leader-lengths will let you cover any depth, from less than a metre (a few feet) to over six metres (20 feet). Intermediate and slow sinking fly-lines are also effective in imitating the shallow angle of ascent of mature nymphs.

Compared to the emergences of chironomids or damselflies, the Callibaetis emergence in many productive stillwaters is relatively short. Often the majority of mayflies in a particular lake will emerge within about a 14-day period; beyond that, there will only be very light hatches. While trout aggressively eat the newly emerged duns that are sitting on the water, there will almost always be more fish gorging on the deeper-swimming nymphs, since it’s always safer to feed closer to the lake-bottom than higher in the water column.

Effective nymphal patterns include pheasant tail nymphs, bead-head pheasant tail nymphs, Gold Bead Hare’s Ear, and Skip Nymphs. Adult patterns that work include the Parachute Adams, Adams, Lady McConnell, slender Humpies, and deer hair emerger mayflies.

Damselflies: Fish a Slow and Steady Retrieve

Damselflies: Fish a Slow and Steady Retrieve



For many, our first encounter with adult damselflies was as kids, chasing them around with butterfly nets along the edge of a lake or pond. These often colourful insects have long, slender abdomens and four thin wings that, at rest, are held along the back of the abdomen. Did you know that damselflies are a prime food source for trout?
Damselflies belong to the insect order Odonata. Worldwide, there are over 650 species of this relatively primitive order, widely distributed from the tropics to the Arctic. Odonata is broken down into two sub-orders: Anisoptera, the dragonflies, and Zygoptera, the damselflies. About 200 species of Zygoptera are found throughout their global range.

Life Cycle

Damselfly life cycles vary in length from one to three years. Damselflies exhibit an “incomplete metamorphosis,” with only three developmental stages: egg, larva (nymph), and adult, but no pupal stage.
During their development, larvae shed their exoskeletons many times to grow. The shedding is called a “molt,” while the period between moltings is called an “instar.”
Larval habitats include the shallow or littoral (edge) zones of lakes, ponds, brackish waters, and the slower reaches of rivers and streams. Damselfly larvae are easily distinguished by their long, slender bodies, distinct wing pads, and well-developed mouthparts. Larvae also possess three paddle-shaped caudal gills (or lamellae) located at the tip of the abdomen. While these gills are an integral part of the respiratory system, they also act as rudders or stabilizers during the larva’s sinusoidal (S-shaped) swimming motion.
At maturity, some larvae can attain lengths over 35 millimetres. Juvenile and maturing larvae seek the cover provided by benthic (near-bottom) and emergent vegetation growing on the shoal or littoral zones of the lake or stream. Ideal habitats are thick mats of stonewort, pondweed, or milfoil growing in water depths from one to five metres.
Damselfly larvae are carnivores: they crawl through vegetation in search of shrimp, mayfly nymphs, chironomid larvae, and zooplankton. Their lower jaw is articulated, and can be extended to grasp unsuspecting prey. Larval colouration often closely matches their habitat, helping them to avoid predators like trout. When fully developed, mature damselfly larvae swim to within about a metre of the surface, searching for emergent vegetation to complete their transformation to adults.
Patches of longstem bulrush and cattail make excellent sites for mature nymphs to crawl up stems out of the water. The skin of each now-exposed larva dries and splits along the back of the thorax, allowing the “teneral” (soft-bodied adult) form to emerge. Over several hours, the newly emerged adults complete development and are able to fly away from the water.
Adult damselflies can live for several months, feeding heavily on smaller flying insects like mosquitoes and mayflies. Mating typically occurs within a couple of weeks of emergence, often preceded by intricate displays of courtship whose end-result is adults flying around in tandem. Egg-laying typically occurs on emergent or floating vegetation. The females use their ovipositor to create an opening in a plant stem into which eggs are deposited.

Fishing the Hatch

Trout patrol the openings between mats of submerged and surface vegetation as they search for both juvenile and maturing larvae. Damselfly larvae are most vulnerable to trout when they begin the “emergence swim” to complete their life cycle. The observant angler should look for large numbers of sinusoidally swimming larvae in the upper layers of the water column. Trout will pick off the larvae as they make their way to patches of bulrushes or cattails.
It’s heart-pounding action when trout hit or roll onto the stems of bulrushes to knock larvae or emerging adults into water only a metre deep. The trout then quickly turn back to feast on the struggling insects.
Fly patterns representing the larvae can vary from quite simple to very realistic in design. Patterns may not have to be too realistic during the first few days of the mature larval emergence swim but, as the trout continue to gorge, they can become fussy as to size, shape, and colour. Since the colour of damselfly larvae will match their habitat, consider that when choosing an appropriate fly. The natural swimming action of marabou fibres makes them an excellent material when tying both suggestive and more realistic larval patterns.
Intermediate/slow sinking and floating fly-lines are ideal for fishing damselfly patterns. The intermediate sinking line is best used to imitate the larval swim from the lake-bottom to the upper water column. Floating lines are perfect for matching mature larvae swimming within the upper metre of water to surface vegetation, as well as for presenting floating adult patterns when fish are being taken in shallow water.
Damselfly larvae are not fast swimmers. They maintain a slow but steady side-to-side action whether swimming up off the lake-bottom, or moving horizontally through the water. A slow, steady hand-twist retrieve, with the occasional side-to-side twitch of the rod tip, is usually all that is needed to attract the attention of a cruising trout.

Author: Brian Chan, Fishing Advisor, Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC

Caddisflies and Dragonflies: Summertime Fly-Fishing Opportunities

 Caddisflies and Dragonflies: Summertime Fly-Fishing Opportunities



Emerging caddisflies and dragonflies are a sure sign that summer has arrived in many of B.C.’s trout fishing lakes. Depending upon lake elevation and geographic location, the first signs of these insect hatches will begin in late June, but definitely peak during the month of July. Caddisflies and dragonflies don’t have prolonged emergences like those of chironomids, but both are big food sources that trout and char look forward to each year.

Caddisflies, also referred to as sedges, can provide some of the best dry fly action of the stillwater fishing season. Ardent caddisfly anglers follow the hatches around Interior lakes in an attempt to prolong the dry fly-fishing action.

Imitating Caddis Pupa

The mature caddis pupa breaks out of its old larval case on the bottom of the lake, in water depths from 1.5 to 7.5 metres (five to 25 feet). Once free, the pupae use an elongated and feathered pair of hind legs to swim quickly to the surface. Trout intercept the pupae on this emergence swim. Pupal imitations include the Knouff Lake Special and the Stillwater Caddis Pupa. Fish pupal patterns on an intermediate- or slow-sinking fly line. Wait for the fly to sink to the bottom before beginning a steady retrieve of 15- to 25-centimetre-long (six- to 10-inch) pulls.

Once at the surface, the adult phase crawls out of its pupal shuck, dries its wings, and then runs across the surface of the lake before flying off to mate. Trout and brook char actively chase down the scampering adult caddis. Big swirling riseforms are evidence of such feeding activity as another adult gets eaten.

Imitating Caddis Adults

Great imitations of the adult caddis are floating deer or elk hair patterns like the Tom Thumb, Elk Hair Caddis, Mikaluk Sedge, and Goddard Caddis. Fishing adult caddis imitations is as simple as casting one out on a floating fly line, and then retrieving it in 10- to 20-centimetre-long (four- to eight-inch) continuous strips that imitate a real caddis running across the surface film.

The caddis emergence is short, often less than a couple of weeks in duration. If you find yourself at a lake this July and see all the surface commotion, you’ll know just what to use.

Imitating Dragonfly Nymphs

Dragonflies are the longest-living aquatic insects found in our lakes. They can live for up to five years in the nymphal stage. The nymphs hide amongst the woody debris and vegetation that cover the bottom of the shoal or shallow-water areas of a waterbody. Dragonfly nymphs are carnivores, and prefer to hunt down shrimp or scuds, mayfly nymphs, and damselfly nymphs.

Trout will search out the dragonfly nymphs at all times of the year. However, it is during their emergence period that nymphs are most vulnerable to trout predation. Fully mature nymphs crawl along the lake bottom to shore, then crawl out of the water and up onto the stems or trunks of shoreline vegetation to complete their transformation to the adult phase. A dragonfly nymph migration will see many nymphs exposing themselves to cruising trout. During a major dragonfly emergence, you will see the newly emerged adults or the empty nymphal shucks clinging to the branches of willow, alder, or coniferous trees along the edge of the lake.

To imitate the nymphal migration, use a full, fast-sinking (Type 3 to Type 6) fly line to cast dragonfly nymph patterns (such as a Butler’s Bug, deer hair Gomphus, or Draggin) tied to a leader between two and three metres in length (seven and nine feet). These patterns can be trolled slowly over the shoal zone, or cast-and-retrieved along the edges of the drop-off as well as on the shoal. The goal is to present the fly just off the lake bottom, which is where the real nymphs will be as well.  Use a slow but steady strip between 10 and 20 centimetres in length (four to eight inches). Expect a hard strike when trout and brook char attack these large food items.

Author: Brian Chan, Fishing Advisor, Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC
Photo Credit: Brian Chan, Fishing Advisor, Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC

Fly-Fishing Tactics for Stillwaters: Shrimp (Scuds)

Fly-Fishing Tactics for Stillwaters: Shrimp (Scuds)

The literally thousands of small lakes in the Interior of B.C. are well-known to both resident and travelling anglers as offering some of the world’s best stillwater fishing for rainbow and brook trout. A combination of nutrient-rich water, long open-water growing seasons, and abundant invertebrate life allow provincial fisheries managers to create a diversity of small-lake fishing experiences.

The backbone of a trout’s invertebrate food sources in these lakes is freshwater shrimp, or scuds. Rainbows and brookies that consume a steady diet of freshwater shrimp will have an appealing, deep-orange flesh and rich flavour.


Pregnant shrimp

Two species of shrimp are found in our productive lakes. Gammarus are the most widely distributed and easily recognized, as they can reach body lengths in excess of 15 millimetres (about 3/5 inch). They are found in a variety of colours, with light to dark olive the most common. Hyalella are much smaller shrimp that rarely exceed four millimetres (less than 1/5 inch) in length and are typically much lighter in colour, with a pale olive-green to light grey predominant.


Hyalella shrimp sample
Preferred Habitat

These freshwater cousins of crabs and lobsters thrive in lakes with high levels of dissolved calcium, which is necessary for the development and maintenance of their chitinous exoskeletons. Shrimp feed on the abundant aquatic plant life found growing in the shallows of lakes. The preferred habitat of Gammarus is the dense mats of submerged vegetation that grow on and off a lake’s shallow or shoal areas. Hyalella prefer burying themselves in the marl-covered bottom areas of shoals. Marl looks like a yellowish to white sand, but is actually a layer of calcium-laden particles that has settled onto the lake bottom. 
Example of marl.
Chara shoal
 

Shrimp are able to reproduce multiple times a year. Hyalella females have as many as 15 broods of offspring, while Gammarus typically have one or two broods each open-water season. Both species can be found inhabiting the same lake.

The density of shrimp populations is directly related to the numbers of fish that predate on them. In fishless lakes, shrimp can often seen swimming throughout the entire water column. In most stocked lakes, though, they will avoid predators by hiding amongst the benthic vegetation, or under rocks and woody debris.

Retrieve Techniques


Shrimp possess multiple pairs of thoracic legs, which typically propel them through the water in erratic 15- to 25-centimetre (six- to 10-inch) bursts followed by a short pause. Trout and char that see a fleeing shrimp will quickly chase it down. An effective retrieve to imitate such movement is to make a series of short but fast 10- to 15-centimetre-long (four- to six-inch) strips interspersed with regular pauses. 

Rainbow trout caught with shrimp pattern

Fly-Fishing Tactics: Sinking Line

Throughout most of the year, catching fish on shrimp imitations means presenting your fly close to the lake bottom where the majority of the real ones are living. This typically means using sinking fly lines of various densities or sink-rates that can cover depths ranging from a metre or so to as deep as six metres (three to as much as 20 feet). Sinking fly lines are rated from Type 1 through Type 8: the number indicates the number of inches per second that the fly line sinks. That would mean a type 3 line sinks at about seven centimetres (three inches) per secod, which equates to about 4.5 metres (15 feet) in one minute.

Fly-Fishing Tactics: Floating Line


In the very late fall, fish will often feed on shrimp in extremely shallow water, sometimes in depths of less than 1.5 metres (five feet). In this situation, casting and retrieving bead-headed or weighted shrimp patterns using a floating fly line can be very effective. Again, use a fast but short strip-retrieve to get the attention of aggressively feeding fish.

Timing


Trout are able to feed on shrimp throughout the year which, at times, can make it challenging to catch fish on shrimp fly imitations. Overall, the best times of the season to fish shrimp are in the early spring and late fall when there are fewer food choices, and trout are feeding in shallow water. Make sure you have a selection of shrimp patterns in your fly box before your next trip to the Interior. Trout and char are opportunistic feeders; they don’t often pass up a well-presented imitation of this important food source.


Shrimp patterns


Author: Brian Chan, Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC ambassador
Photos: Brent Gill, Brian Chan

Thursday, November 3, 2005

ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ

ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ

خاطرات‌ ماهیگیری قزل آلا



fly fishing in Iran

I would like to talk about my fly fishing history I’ve been wanting to tell my story for a long time now that my English is good , when I started fly fishing in Iran I lived in the city of Shiraz we never had any fly fishing stores in my city , I seen on tv fly fishing I did much research mainly focused on British and Canada , ten years ago someone gave me some fly fishing reels I made a fly fishing rod from a regular fishing rod , I made flys with anything I found lying around it was fun , I used the bag from the chips and made the flash to make it shine I also used women’s hair from the salon to have different colours I was happy , this happened ten years ago this is still happening in Shiraz till this day , with my newly made fishing  flys I caught many large fish such as rainbow trout
 After six years of fly fishing in Iran I tried to move to Canada with one back pack and a fly box and my fly fishing rod it took me two years to arrive in Canada  Looking back I always in awe  of @aprilvokey She was my fishing hero someone to look up to and watch , it’s hard to believe I’m in British Columbia when I seen my first fly shop I started crying I was so so happy I could not believe what I seen , I’m not a professional fly fisherman but I was it so much it’s my life  it took a long time to get here as I was a refugee on the way I tattooed my arm fly fishing name and I’m so proud to be part of all the fly fisherman, when I arrived in Canada I only had five dollars to my name , I started working hard and built up my fly fishing equipment , my other dream was to get a Siberian Husky I adopted Skipper from Iran he goes where ever I go Dreams do come true thank you every one so much

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

fly fishing in iran



FLY FISHING IN IRAN   / 2007



fly fishing in Iran

steelhead society SSBC Pub Nite Fundraiser 2019

fly fishing in Iran

تاکتیک های ماهیگیری فلای فیشینگ (تجربه شخصی)



ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

تاکتیک های ماهیگیری فلای فیشینگ (تجربه شخصی)

Spey Clave 2018 British Columbia Cultus Lake (SPEY DAY 2019)

Spey Clave 2018 British Columbia Cultus Lake (SPEY DAY 2018)


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

نبرد صید رنگین کمان‌های بومی در بالاترین سطح فلای فیشینگ دنیا

fly fishing in Iran

تاکتیک‌ ماهیگیری با استفاده از حشره های میج در دریاچه برای صید ماهی رنگین‌کمان



کاربرد Indicator و پترن کارمید در صید قزل الا با فلای فیشینگ



فلای فیشینگ آب شور

معرفی گونه coastal cutthroat trout

همه چیز درباره فلای فیشینگ

نکاتی درباره پرتاب در فلای فیشینگ و معرفی نسل جدید نخ ها Skagit, commando head , skandi

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

همه چیز درباره فلای فیشینگ

یک‌ عکس چالش بسیار زیبا از پیشرفت یک دهه ماهیگیری فلای ابشور

تاکتیک استفاده از تروت بید  trout bead (گرد مهره)



ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher



سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران



حمله ماهی قزل آلا و راه کار های صید ماهی

راهکار های صید ماهی قزل آلای رنگین کمان (تمام سیستم های ماهیگیری)

سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران 12 عکس برتر مسابقه

 

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

نتیجه دور سوم مسابقات پشه بافی

 نتیجه دوره چهارم مسابقات پشه بافی

نتیجه دوره پنجم مسابقات پشه بافی



fly fishing in Iran

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

روش بافت pheasant tail nymph

همه چیز درباره فلای فیشینگ

ماهی قزل آلا trout

fly fishing in Iran
fly fishing in Iran


Tarpon jumps 150 Lb , ebi fisher



monster Tarpon it was quite the struggle as he went under the boat

Tarpon jumps, I never get tired of seeing him even a thousand times



 
ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


  cutty & dolly in Squamish River




boom 💥 I caught my first bull trou a s brook trout








 
 

British Columbia Brook Trout 


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

Fall Fun in British Columbia & fishing & camping

BC Bull Trout Fishing



Kamloops fly fishing report by ebi fisher





 
 
ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

British Columbia Brook Trout



Fly Fishing BC for Brook Trout & bull trout & rainbow trout



 

  cutty & dolly in Squamish River


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher





ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


فلای فیشینگ آب شور

نکاتی درباره پرتاب در فلای فیشینگ و معرفی نسل جدید نخ ها Skagit, commando head , skandi

فلای فیشینگ آب شور


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

فلای فیشینگ آب شور

نکاتی درباره پرتاب در فلای فیشینگ و معرفی نسل جدید نخ ها Skagit, commando head , skandi








همه چیز درباره فلای فیشینگ


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


نتیجه دور اول مسابقه پشه بافی 

دور دوم مسابقه پشه بافی



سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران

سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران 12 عکس برتر مسابقه

نتیجه دور سوم مسابقات پشه بافی


نتیجه دوره چهارم مسابقات پشه بافی


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher



روش بافت pheasant tail nymph

همه چیز درباره فلای فیشینگ
saltwater fly fishing / puerto vallarta mexico
saltwater fly fishing / puerto vallarta mexico

فلای فیشینگ آب شور





saltwater fly fishing / puerto vallarta mexico

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher



نتیجه دور اول مسابقه پشه بافی 

دور دوم مسابقه پشه بافی



سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران 12 عکس برتر مسابقه

نتیجه دور سوم مسابقات پشه بافی


نتیجه دوره چهارم مسابقات پشه بافی





روش بافت pheasant tail nymph

همه چیز درباره فلای فیشینگ




saltwater fly fishing / puerto vallarta mexico

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher
saltwater fly fishing / puerto vallarta mexico

saltwater fly fishing / puerto vallarta mexico




همه چیز درباره فلای فیشینگ


نتیجه دور اول مسابقه پشه بافی 

دور دوم مسابقه پشه بافی

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران

سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران 12 عکس برتر مسابقه

نتیجه دور سوم مسابقات پشه بافی


نتیجه دوره چهارم مسابقات پشه بافی








روش بافت pheasant tail nymph

همه چیز درباره فلای فیشینگ
ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


History of fly fishing of the Iran
تاریخچه فلای فیشینگ آب شور ایران
ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher



اولین‌ تارپون صید شده با سیستم فلای فیشینگ‌ توسط یک‌ ماهیگیر ایرانی
تاریخچه فلای فیشینگ‌ ایران
تاریخ فلای فیشینگ
Iran saltwater fly fishing history
Ebi Fisher 



تارپون
ماهی تارپون
صید ماهی تارپون
صید ماهی تارپون با سیستم‌فلای فیشینگ
صید ماهی تارپون با سیستم پشه
ابی فیشر صید ماهی تارپون
ابی فیشر صید ماهی تارپون با سیستم فلای فیشینگ 
ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

Giant Tarpon On the fly Costa Rica Tarponville - Tarpon rolling

سفرنامه کامل صید اولین‌ تارپون های قول پیکر با سیستم فلای فیشینگ و افتخاری برای تاریخ فلای فیشینگ ایران





ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

Giant Tarpon On the fly Costa Rica Tarponville - Tarpon rolling

iran tarpon
shiraz tarpon
Tehran tarpon
 tarpon iran



انجمن‌ ماهیگیری استان فارس

انجمن‌ ماهیگیری استان قم

انجمن‌ ماهیگیری استلن‌ تبریز

انجمن‌ ماهیگیری استان کرمان

فدراسیون ورزش های همگانی ماهیگیری


ماهیگیری

فدراسیون‌ ماهیگیری ایران

فدراسیون‌ماهیگیری ورزشی

ماهیگیری ابشور

فلای ابشور


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

صید ماهی قول با سیستم‌ فلای فیشینگ

فدراسیون‌ ماهیگیری استان فارس

فدراسیون‌ ماهیگیری استان قم


Out with the boys fishing on the Vedder river Caught 5 silver salamon !






ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher
saltwater fly fishing / puerto vallarta mexico

فلای فیشینگ آب شور





همه چیز درباره فلای فیشینگ


نتیجه دور اول مسابقه پشه بافی 

دور دوم مسابقه پشه بافی



سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران

سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران 12 عکس برتر مسابقه

نتیجه دور سوم مسابقات پشه بافی


نتیجه دوره چهارم مسابقات پشه بافی





روش بافت pheasant tail nymph

همه چیز درباره فلای فیشینگ



ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher
History of fly fishing of the Iran

 

تاریخچه فلای فیشینگ آب شور ایران


اولین‌ تارپون صید شده با سیستم فلای فیشینگ‌ توسط یک‌ ماهیگیر ایرانی


تاریخچه فلای فیشینگ‌ ایران



تاریخ فلای فیشینگ


Iran saltwater fly fishing history
Ebi Fisher 
تارپون
ماهی تارپون
صید ماهی تارپون
صید ماهی تارپون با سیستم‌فلای فیشینگ
صید ماهی تارپون با سیستم پشه
ابی فیشر صید ماهی تارپون
ابی فیشر صید ماهی تارپون با سیستم فلای فیشینگ 

Ebi Fisher
سفرنامه کامل صید اولین‌ تارپون های قول پیکر با سیستم فلای فیشینگ و افتخاری برای تاریخ فلای فیشینگ ایران
Ebi Fisher Ebi Fisher Ebi Fisher Ebi Fisher

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher
  
Skagit River Trout Fishing
A Weekend of Fishing the Skagit River
Skagit River | CzechNymph
Skagit River Therapy
Skagit River - Fishing with Ebi Fisher
skagit river bc access
skagit river bc access
skagit river fishing regulations
skagit river bc map
skagit river fishing 2019



ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥



🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥




Tarpon jumps 150 Lb , ebi fisher



monster Tarpon it was quite the struggle as he went under the boat

Tarpon jumps, I never get tired of seeing him even a thousand times


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher




monster Tarpon it was quite the struggle as he went under the boat

Tarpon jumps, I never get tired of seeing him even a thousand times !

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher




ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

روش بافت pheasant tail nymph

همه چیز درباره فلای فیشینگ



نتیجه دور سوم مسابقات پشه بافی

نتیجه دوره چهارم مسابقات پشه بافی



ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

نتیجه دور اول مسابقه پشه بافی 

دور دوم مسابقه پشه بافی

سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران

سری دوم مسابقات عکس های ماهیگیری ورزشی ایران 12 عکس برتر مسابقه






  chum slamon center pin



ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher



ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


الان که دارم این‌پست‌ قرار میدم در حال جمع کردن لوازم ماهیگیریم هستم و فردارو برگردم‌ ماهیگیری ! این دفعه به خاطر خطرناک بودن‌منطقه اسکیپر رو همراه خودم‌ نمی برم دو روز کار ۴ روز ماهیگیری 😀 

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher

ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


 
Beautiful, chrome female chum salmon , vedder river BC
This beautiful, chrome female chum salmon grabbed my jig under the float yesterday on the Vedder River. We took this quick photo and let her go right afterward.



Out with the boys fishing on the Vedder river. Caught 5 silver salamon !


ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


Out with the boys fishing on the Vedder river. Caught 5 silver salamon !


 
مجله ماهیگیری ورزشی
 
ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher
 
 

****************
ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


 

  cutty & dolly in Squamish River




boom 💥 I caught my first bull trou a s brook trout


Fly Fishing BC for Brook Trout & bull trout & rainbow trout



  

British Columbia Brook Trout 

Fall Fun in British Columbia & fishing & camping

BC Bull Trout Fishing


 buzz bomb fishing
ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher


http://online.fliphtml5.com/tqxa/twrm/#p=1 

http://online.fliphtml5.com/tqxa/twrm/#p=1
Trout family art  طراحی انواع قزل آلا
ابی فیشر , ابی فیشر کانادا , ابی فیشر فلای فیشینگ , ابی فیشینگ , قزل الا ابی فیشر , ebifisher , ei fisher